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Home » motorcycle, Yamaha

2012 Yamaha YZF-R1

Submitted by on May 3, 2012 – 10:38 pmOne Comment

This time around, however, the result was different. Instead of violently spinning the rear tire and going sideways rather than forwards, in a fraction of a second the R1 performed its numerous calculations, determined I was trying to drive out of a turn, and instead of throwing me over the highside, delivered just enough power to the ground to keep me going forward with minimal wheel spin. A believer I became.

Such is the beauty of traction control. Combine that with the R1’s crossplane crankshaft that delivers a seemingly direct connection between the rear tire and the rider, and you’ve got a motorcycle that inspires confidence in spades.

Besides the new traction control system, however, the new R1 is largely the same machine we’ve had since 2009. It’s still powered by the same 998cc inline-Four cylinder engine, using crossplane crankshaft technology derived from MotoGP. Power output remains the same which, according to our 2009 Literbike Shootout, means 146.1 horsepower to the rear wheel at 11,800 rpm. That number was the lowest of the quartet back then, and with new models today knocking on the door of 200 (crankshaft) horsepower, it’s interesting to think Yamaha may have missed the boat in adding more power for this 2012 redesign. Though surely nobody will argue that roughly 150 horsepower reaching the rear wheel is still some serious gusto for forward propulsion.

Both Yamaha’s Chip Controlled Throttle (YCC-T) and Intake (YCC-I) are carryovers to the 2012 model, with the former gaining even more significance with the addition of traction control. If you’re not familiar, YCC-T is corporate speak for electronic or “fly-by-wire” throttle technology, while YCC-I is in reference to the variable intake stacks that extend past a certain rpm to provide maximum torque down low and horsepower up high in the rev range.

More carryovers include the three-position D-Mode, or “Drive Mode,” which, at the flick of a button, alters throttle, fuel and ignition mapping for various road conditions. A, B and Standard mode remain the same, with Standard mode providing the optimum overall performance. “A” mode puts more emphasis on acceleration in low-mid rpm, while “B” mode meanwhile does the opposite – providing a 30% slower throttle response at all openings – for those times when the road ahead is slippery and traction is compromised.

While the addition of traction control is clearly the most significant addition to the new R1, Yamaha has also decided to clean it up around the edges. Subtle tweaks to the headlight cowling include larger LED position lamps at the outer edges, with reflectors added to the lower portion of the cowling – similar to Audi cars – to bolster the attitude from the front end compared to last year’s model.

All is status quo on the chassis front, save for a new rear spring on the fully-adjustable shock that is slightly stiffer at the beginning of the stroke and softer at the end. Yamaha believes this will improve rear traction while also providing a smoother ride through better bump absorption. Other than that, the chassis remains the same. Steering geometry is untouched, with a 24-degree rake and four inches of trail. Front suspension is still the same with a fully-adjustable 43mm inverted fork, with one stanchion controlling rebound damping and the other compression.

Footpegs also remain the same from last year, with its two-way adjustability allowing them to move up and backward from their standard position 15mm and 3mm, respectively. The pegs themselves are knurled all the way to the tip for better boot grip, something the older model didn’t have. Other minor tweaks include new muffler heat shields and end cap design, which give the rear of the R1 a narrower image. Finally, a new top triple clamp design is inspired by the YZR-M1 MotoGP machine. All told, it would be difficult to notice the difference between the 2012 R1 and its predecessors at first glance; it really takes an in-depth look to be able to tell the two apart.

otomaps.com source article: www.netcarshow.com www.motorcycle.com www.roushperformance.com

One Comment »

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