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Home » Kawasaki Motorcylce, motorcycle

Kawasaki Z1000 2010

Submitted by on April 5, 2012 – 11:35 pmNo Comment

They make lots of usable torque, have excellent chassis, and typically provide an open and upright riding position. Best of all, most of ‘em wheelie like the dickens! Sign me up!

Alas, the nakeds see immensely larger sales volume in Europe than here in America, and therefore most OEMs are reluctant to either import them whatsoever, or if they do, they come in relatively small batches.

Yep, with us, it seems its either some type of cruiser, custom, or race-replica sportbike for the street; otherwise, good luck if you don’t fit any of those molds. Boo!

Kawasaki gave it the ol’ college try in 2003 when it created the original Z1000 and hoped riders in the states would take to it like the company knew the European market would, and indeed did.

It seemed to have all the right ingredients: Ninja ZX-9R-sourced engine with a 2.2mm overbore for a 953cc inline Four; 17-inch wheels ready for sportbike rubber; upright ergos with a one-piece motocross-type handlebar for a comfortable seating position that allowed aggressive handling; and styling was equally aggressive.

However, it was a sales flop in America. Were it not for the devotion of the powers that be at Kawasaki Motors Corporation, Inc, in Irvine, CA, the Z wouldn’t have seen the light of day in the U.S. in ’07.

Despite big updates to styling as well as various functional items for 2007 for the Euro market, like radial-mount front calipers and improved bottom-end power, the Z wasn’t slated for us. Yet, upon seeing the new bike in Japan during some internal meetings, Kawi’s U.S. execs had to have it.

Though the change is subtle, the headlamp/flyscreen is altered slightly, giving the Z an even sleeker, meaner face, and the headlight is Kawasaki’s first use of a “line-beam unit.” A new LCD instrument panel, visible through an orange lens, can be tilted for better viewing angles.

The inverted 41mm fork picked compression damping adjustment for a now fully adjustable front-end, and a new shroud over the fork tubes make it look like one, big stout unit.

Also, a new chin fairing helps camouflage exhaust headers while additional pieces cover the mid-pipe portion just fore of the dual exhaust cans that engineers made shorter than on the 2007-08 Z1000 thanks to the use of an under-engine pre-chamber. Otherwise, the exhaust retains the “quad” look.

But more importantly, the engine is all-new. On the surface it would seem some type of variation on the screamin’-fast ZX-10R powerplant. However, Kawi says the engine isn’t borrowed from the Ninja.

The previous Z had a bore and stroke of 77.2 x 50.9mm, unchanged from the first generation Z’s 953cc displacement. The 2010 model now sports 77 x 56mm bore and stroke figures – exactly 1mm over the ZX-10R’s 76 x 55mm – for an engine displacing 1,043cc. Compression ratio is 11.8:1, and fueling is handled by a bank of 38mm Keihin throttle bodies.

The new Z also has longer airbox intake snorkels compared to those on the big Ninja’s mill, with the benefit being improved mid-range. A secondary balance shaft eliminates excess vibes, but Kawi also says “a little bit of character is designed in.” Hmm…

The Z’s air-intake system uses ducts just ahead of the fuel tank, a placement Kawasaki says lets the rider “savor the bold sound of screaming air being sucked into the engine’s downdraft intakes.” The company claims the Z’s engine to be noticeably smoother and quicker above 7,000 rpm.
A six-speed gearbox utilizes crankshaft and transmission shafts arranged in a straight line instead of a triangular layout.

Kawasaki isn’t able to reveal precise horsepower claims yet, but a safe guess would have the new Z engine turning out well beyond 120 rwhp. Kawasaki did, however, remark that the new Z produces the same torque as the ZX10, but the Z’s peak allegedly is 900 rpm lower.

otomaps.com source article: www.netcarshow.com www.motorcycle.com www.roushperformance.com

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