classic

classic automotive reviews, specifications, insurance accident lawyers information, cars, motorcycle honda aprilia lamborghini yamaha Harley Davidson ATV news

Finance

Finance automotive reviews, specifications, insurance accident lawyers information, cars, motorcycle honda aprilia lamborghini yamaha Harley Davidson ATV news

insurance

Insurance automotive reviews, specifications, insurance accident lawyers information, cars, motorcycle honda aprilia lamborghini yamaha Harley Davidson ATV news

accident

accident automotive reviews, specifications, insurance accident lawyers information, cars, motorcycle honda aprilia lamborghini yamaha Harley Davidson ATV news

news

news automotive reviews, specifications, insurance accident lawyers information, cars, motorcycle honda aprilia lamborghini yamaha Harley Davidson ATV news

Home » Kawasaki Motorcylce, motorcycle

Kawasaki KX250F 2010

Submitted by on April 5, 2012 – 11:35 pmNo Comment

Based on the immense success of its 250 metal on the national scene, Kawasaki must have decided not to detour from their proven, race-winning platform and have focused its attention on subtle refinements to hone performance while extending durability, a kind of nip/tuck for 2010.

For starters the KX’s 249cc, liquid-cooled, 4-stroke single-cylinder DOHC, 4-valve powerplant has received a number of refinements that enhance an already potent package. Making its first appearance in a mass-production motorcycle, the KX250F receives a “bridged-box bottom” race-inspired piston, which is lighter and stronger due supporting ribs that reinforce the piston pin shaft. The new piston has a shorter skirt and narrower piston pin to reduce reciprocating mass, resulting in a quicker revving motor. The piston’s crown has been reshaped, adding 0.6mm in height to improve combustion with the cylinder height increased slightly to maintain a 13.2:1 compression ratio.

A new exhaust pipe – made from stainless steel for increased durability – is comprised of a longer head pipe married to a shorter mid-section to boost low-rpm performance. The pipe/muffler joint and clamp has been modified to improve exhaust seal while the tail of the muffler is rubber-mounted for shock absorption.

Kawasaki implemented an “electrofusion treatment” on the cylinder bore for better oil retention and less scorching, thus making the top-end more resistant to seizing. These top-end changes, coupled with new, wider (from 5mm to 5.5mm) oil pump rotors – that have increased oil flow by 10% – and a wider big-end rod bearing are specifically aimed at extending engine life and increasing reliability. The technicians at Kawasaki boast that they’ve gotten the KX’s crankshaft balance closer to that of the factory racers, resulting in less vibration, which translates into smoother throttle response.

The 250 (like its big brother KX450F gets larger, wider radiators with a fin pitch designed to accumulate less mud. The increased rigidity of the new radiators allows the reinforcing brackets and support stays to be removed, resulting in reduced overall radiator weight.

On the transmission end, beefier dogs were added to the 3rd and 4th input gears to reduce wear while the circlip and washer of the 4th input gear holding method was eliminated by redesigning the 2nd input gear to carry the weight load instead of the washer. The result of these changes is increased precision of the shifts with added strength and durability. The five-speed transmission enlists the same ratios as last year. Crankcases have been thickened overall with added material at crucial engine mounting holes.

The main chassis mods for 2010 are a decreased diameter steering stem and redesigned swingarm. By reducing the size of the steering stem – from 24mm to 23mm – rigidity is reduced, theoretically giving the bike a slightly lighter feel in handling. This same theory applies to the swingarm, with the overall wall thickness being reduced and coupled with a reworked, less gussetted cross section designed to lower rigidity, which ultimately contributes to a lighter handling machine by allowing some flex.

As for the basic numbers (as per Kawasaki’s press material), seat height is 37.6 inches. Wheelbase is at 57.9-inches. Ground clearance is 13.4-inches and the claimed curb weight (a.k.a. “wet”) is 231.4 pounds.

Showa twin-chamber forks have titanium-coated lower tubes that reduce friction for smoother response. The 16-way compression and rebound damping adjustments augment 12.4 inches of fork travel. The damping settings are new, with less forward lean that lends more balance in the bike’s front to rear attitude. The new damping settings on the Showa rear shock combined with the new rocker arm are implemented to reduce kicking on corner entry. The rear shock possesses 13-way low-speed and stepless high-speed compression damping with 17-position rebound damping and fully adjustable spring preload, providing 12.2 inches of rear wheel travel.

otomaps.com source article: www.netcarshow.com www.motorcycle.com www.roushperformance.com

Leave a comment!

Add your comment below, or trackback from your own site. You can also subscribe to these comments via RSS.

Be nice. Keep it clean. Stay on topic. No spam.

You can use these tags:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

This is a Gravatar-enabled weblog. To get your own globally-recognized-avatar, please register at Gravatar.

*