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Home » ducati motorcycle, motorcycle

Ducati M750 Monster 1997

Submitted by on December 21, 2011 – 10:52 amNo Comment

If you don’t know anything about the eccentric Monster family it will be very difficult for you, at first sight, to distinguish differences between the nearly identical looking 900, 600 and 750. Thanks to my local Ducati dealer here in Barcelona, Spain, I can now offer assistance in distinguishing the differences between members of this strange family, all dressed in curious designs and surprisingly easy for anybody to ride.

The M750’s signature gold painted multi-tubular trellis frame — similar in style to its close cousins the Supersports, 916 and the new ST2 — is identical throughout the Monster family. Wheelbase and seat height are identical as well. This simple design includes a fat, 4.3 gallon fuel tank and an attractive removable seat cowl. The spartan instrument panel features a white faced speedometer and a large assortment of indicators — neutral, turn signals, oil pressure, high beams, battery charge, fuel and side stand lights. Unfortunately, due to a defect in the Monster family’s genetic code, the tachometer is missing.

The M750’s bodywork and suspension boast of its Italian lineage. Upside-down Marzocchi forks grace the front end; however, only the spring preload is adjustable. A single Sachs-Boge shock with spring preload and rebound damping adjustment forms the rear suspension. A pair of 17-inch Brembo three-spoked alloy wheels shod with Dunlop Sportmax II tires act as our road-grip insurance. The M750 stops up front by a single 320 mm front Brembo rotor — dual rotors stop the 900 Monster — and a four-piston Brembo Gold Series caliper. A single 245 mm Brembo rotor is found at the rear. Unlike the M900, this little Monster isn’t adorned with carbon fiber.

readmore :www.motorcycle.com

otomaps.com source article: www.netcarshow.com www.motorcycle.com www.roushperformance.com

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