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Home » BMW Motorcycle, motorcycle

BMW S1000RR 2010

Submitted by on March 30, 2012 – 12:11 amNo Comment

The base S1000RR retails in America for $13,800, but the bikes we’d be riding were equipped with BMW’s optional electronic rider aids. As with 98% of S1000RR pre-orders, our bikes had the $1,480 traction control and Race ABS option, plus the $450 Gearshift Assistant that allows full-throttle upshifts without backing off the throttle or using the clutch. The only thing missing from a fully optioned RR is the white, red and blue BMW Motorsport color, a $750 option that has been selected in about 50% of pre-orders thus far. The test bikes were flavored in a unique Acid Green Metallic, but other color choices include a classy Mineral Silver Metallic or a sinister Thunder Grey (black) Metallic

Advanced technology features heavily on the S1000RR. Base models include electronics that influence power and throttle response over four possible modes: Rain, Sport, Race and Slick. It’s simple to select while stationary, but they can be changed even while riding. A press of the nicely damped right-side switchgear selects the desired mode, then you have 60 seconds in which to close the throttle and pull in the clutch which triggers the new mode you’ve chosen.

The Dynamic Traction Control/ABS option (either of which can be disabled if desired) adds to the four riding modes a few other rider aids, including varying ABS settings and a form of wheelie control. Wheel-speed sensors supply info for the ABS and traction control, and a gyro mounted under the seat provides additional data to the bike’s ECU to influence throttle response and to provide a measure of wheelie control.

Instrumentation is robust. An analog tach features prominently, with LCD displays for speed, an easily read gear indicator, and an adjustable (for both brightness and frequency) shift light. Lap times can be logged by engaging the high-beam flash trigger or by a trackside beacon and can display last lap time, best lap, number of laps, accelerator position in percentage per lap, time per lap the brakes were applied, minimum and maximum speeds and the number of gearshifts. Whew!

Slick mode also allows access to wheelies without disabling the DTC, but there are still a couple of electronic nannies in place to keep a rider safe. Mono-wheeling remains verboten if the bike is at a lean angle greater than 23 degrees, and the duration of a wheelie is limited to five seconds of fun before the electronic cops are called in to spoil the party. If wheelies are a prerequisite in your hooligan world, simply turning off the DTC will enable your Jason Britton imitations.

One other noteworthy trait of Slick mode is that the rear brake loses its anti-lock control so your inner Ben Bostrom can pull hackers on corner entries. Truth be told, I barely remember even using the rear brake. The Brembo radial-mount front calipers and 320mm floating front rotors are deliciously powerful, exhibiting exemplary feel through steel-braided lines without a harsh initial bite.

I spent the rest of my day in Slick mode, as it was the closest comparison to the literbike rivals without disabling the traction control entirely. Positive impressions were plentiful.

First off, I was amazed at the grip and durability of the Racetech K3s. Good front-end feel and feedback through the beefy 46mm inverted fork inspired confidence, and the S1000 needed to be ridden quite aggressively before I could get the footpeg feelers to skim the pavement. Corner entries are aided by a back-torque-limiting (slipper) clutch that performed well.

Not a lot of time has passed since the recent construction of the Portimao circuit, so there weren’t many bumps on which to test the S1000’s fully adjustable suspension. As set up, it performed perfectly, and we award BMW kudos for giving each compression and rebound damping adjuster clearly labeled numbers from 1 to 10 to simplify keeping track of your settings. Front and rear ride heights are also adjustable.

Multiple trips to the S1000’s redline gave plenty of opportunities to sample the characteristics of BMW Motorrad’s highest specific-output engine ever, and I was surprised the non-counterbalanced engine didn’t give off objectionable vibration at any speed. Christian Landerl, Executive VP Development and Model Lines, BMW Motorrad, told us it was because of the engine’s lightweight components and the particular frame design.

otomaps.com source article: www.netcarshow.com www.motorcycle.com www.roushperformance.com

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