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Home » BMW Motorcycle, motorcycle

BMW S1000RR 2009

Submitted by on March 29, 2012 – 11:44 pmNo Comment

First, de Waal notes that consumers in this market aren’t very brand loyal – they are looking only for the maximum performance and the best appearance, he says. Second, the literbike market can be lucrative. There are about 220,000 of the sports machines sold annually worldwide, so even just 5% of that pie equates to more than 10,000 bikes. And BMW isn’t looking to poach from their existing customers with its new sportsbike, as de Waal says 90-95% of S1000RR owners will be conquest sales for the historic brand.

If BMW wants to make a dent in this competitive market, it can’t offer up a boutique-style $40,000 streetbike. Although BMW is known for being one of the pricier brands, the company is aiming to keep the MSRP of its RR to within about 10% of its Japanese rivals, now priced around $12,000. As such, when the S1000 arrives in December of 2009, we hope to see it priced at about $14,000.

To keep its costs down as much as possible, component sourcing from other manufacturers and countries will be critical. BMW already has contracted Taiwan-based Kymco to build the G450X and G650 single-cylinder engines to BMW specs. We might expect a similar arrangement for the S1000RR.

Despite these turbulent economic times, World Superbike is ramping up for a renaissance season in which there will be factory-supported teams from no less than seven manufacturers. New to the series is the V-Four-powered Aprilia RSV4, plus BMW’s S1000RR. De Waal says BMW decided to enter WSB racing (not MotoGP) to prove a BMW production bike can beat the competition.

The S1000RR has already had a couple of public on-track displays, most recently at South Africa’s Kyalami circuit as part of a WSB post-season test on December 10-12.

Trackside observers say the pitch of the BMW’s exhaust note is higher than the other four-cylinder machines, giving credence to the theory that the S1000 revs higher than its competition. It’s also worth noting that the WSB rules have been revised for ’09 to remove rev-limit restrictions (14,000 rpm) for engines with a bore/stroke ratio of 1.5:1 or greater, so the RR will likely have a bigger bore and shorter stroke than its 1000cc competition, and the mysterious new valvetrain will allow for sky-high revs.

Although blessed with a two top-shelf riders in the form of multi-time WSB champion Troy Corser and perennial contender Ruben Xaus, the lap times logged at Kyalami showed the BMW near the back of the pack thus far, although it’s still early days for the developing German bike.

Of the 13 bikes at the test, the BMWs were in 11th (Corser) and 13th (Xaus) places in terms of best lap times over the three-day test. However, Corser’s pace was only 1.4 seconds off the quickest lap, and just slightly less than a second behind the developed Honda CBR1000RR of MotoGP veteran Carlos Checa.

“I am reasonably happy with what we achieved these three days because I always knew it wasn’t going to be easy,” said Corser. “In fact, the times we did were a bit better than I thought they would be. We weren’t chasing lap times here because we wanted to get to understand the bike first and that’s why we also didn’t use any electronic aids, like traction control for example.”

otomaps.com source article: www.netcarshow.com www.motorcycle.com www.roushperformance.com

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