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Home » BMW Motorcycle, motorcycle

BMW K1200R Sport 2007

Submitted by on March 29, 2012 – 11:30 pmNo Comment

Fonz observes, almost as if he has firsthand experience.

Unfortunately, the motor becomes buzzy starting around 4,500 rpm and comes on fully over 6,000. After a ride that stitched a series of canyons and freeways together, my hands and feet were tingling. Nearly as bothersome as the vibes is an annoying dip in the power that starts around 6,000 rpm and lasts somewhere near to 7,200 rpm. During my ride when I would concentrate on a sharp, decreasing radius bend more than what the tach was doing, the flat spot in acceleration was severe enough to break my thought process. “Oh yeah, there’s that flat spot again,” I would lament.

After I acquiesced to that motor quirk, I spent the remainder of my eval time on handling and braking. If it isn’t obvious by the numbers for the wheelbase, let me make it clear that the Sport isn’t a slicer and dicer. What it is, though, is an incredibly stable motorcycle in high-speed sweepers. Even when running up against the redline and into less-than-legal speeds, there was little in the road that could unsettle the chassis. It’s as planted in turns as Robert Byrd is in the U.S. Senate. The K12’s steering geometry of 29.4 degrees of rake and 112mm of trail clearly indicate that stability was a greater goal for BMW than flickability.

“In the city the steering is slightly heavy,” Fonz admits, “but it is forgotten after a few miles. On the interstate, the solid and smooth comfort of the hyper-standard really comes out.”

Although the unconventional Hossack-type front end doesn’t allow for superbike front-end feedback, I certainly didn’t notice the lack of feel that so many others have often spoken of. There was a degree of vagueness over rough sections of pavement where an uneven surface may have caused the front to search for traction, but I never felt uneasy. After all, that’s the nature of that suspension system; to isolate much of the harshness of the tarmac from the rider.

Lucky for us, our model had the optional (and by now, well-known) ESA or Electronic Suspension Adjustment system. With the push of a button, the rider can set the springy bits to accommodate for one rider or two, with or without luggage. Beyond that there are three primary modes that provide different front rebound damping, rear preload, rear compression damping and rear rebound damping settings. When you factor in the passenger and luggage choices, the ESA provides nine different set-ups. That should cover just about every scenario you can think of. It costs a hefty $800 but is indispensable if you’ve got the dough.

I implied above that the BMW ABS system is somewhat legendary in its ability to haul the bike to a stop. Unfortunately, it lacks feel and there is a very minute delay from first application of the lever to when the calipers squeeze down. When they do, you’ll know it! It seems as if all at once you’ve applied more than 70% of the available stopping power for just a second or two even though you may not have intended to. Where this is particularly troublesome is in trying to modulate the brakes and throttle while in a series of tight twists. The ABS option ain’t cheap, at $1040, but BMW estimates 85% of the Sports will be ordered with the safety device.

Transitioning from closed to open throttle can be annoying thanks to yet another delay. There’s just the slightest hesitation in fueling when the twistgrip is first, well, twisted. Combine the aggressive braking at the on-set with the closed to open throttle delay, and a very smooth and controlled hand is required to keep mid-corner maneuvers from becoming jerky. (Surgeons can afford it –Ed.)

otomaps.com source article: www.netcarshow.com www.motorcycle.com www.roushperformance.com

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