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Home » BMW Motorcycle, motorcycle

BMW K 1200 S 2005

Submitted by on March 29, 2012 – 12:49 pmNo Comment

When BMW introduced the initial run of K1200S’ to the world’s press last fall, they were surprised to hear numerous complaints from the assembled journos, concerning various fuel injection and rideability issues. Now, almost a year later, BMW says they’ve fixed those initial problems and are introducing an updated version of the K1200S to the US press. The rest of the machine is unchanged from its initial launch, and you can refer back to Yossef’s excellent Technical Introduction, for a complete rundown on its highlights and features.

BMW states that they addressed those early issues by redesigning the combustion chamber shape and completely re-mapping both the ignition and the fuel injection systems. They also revised the production line procedures and changed the hardening process for the camshafts to enhance durability.

According to BMW, the K1200S is not intended as a direct replacement for last year’s K1200RS, but they would still like to point out that the new S is 26% lighter than the old RS, now weighing a claimed 499Lbs dry and 546Lbs “wet” (all fluids + 90% fuel). They also claim that the K1200S’ engine produces 167HP @ 10,250Rpm and 96LbFt @ 8,250RPM at the crank. Unfortunately, those ponies can’t all make it to the tire, so the MO Dynojet recorded an actual 144.71HP @ 10,100Rpm. That’s stout to be sure, but probably not going to set the world on fire. However, the truly impressive figure is the 50+LbFt of torque delivered at a mere 1,800Rpm. Torque builds quickly from there on its long climb to a peak of 85.29LbFt @ 8,400Rpm, before tapering off to 70LbFt at the rev-limiter.

The great thing about this kind of power delivery is that you receive strong acceleration, regardless of gear selection or rpm. Indeed, the K1200S blurs scenery in the same effortless and invigorating manner as the Hayabusa and ZX-12R. According to our dyno tests, the K1200S spins the rear tire to 175mph at the top of sixth gear. I can personally verify that it will charge right up to an indicated 180mph in the real world, and I suspect that there might be a German nanny hidden away in there, preventing the bike from reaching its full top-speed potential. Honestly, the real difference in top-speeds is irrelevant, as all these bikes will spend 99.999% of their lives somewhere south of 130mph.

In normal use, we spend a much greater percentage of our time riding at smaller throttle openings. Unfortunately, this is where the K1200S presents its first major weakness. Though BMW claims to have solved last year’s fuel injection woes, all three bikes that I’ve ridden for this story are still afflicted with a funky off/on throttle transition. It appears that BMW mapped the electronics to increase idle speed during trailing-throttle use, so that when the throttle is re-opened the engine has already covered the awkward transition. Unfortunately, not only did this not solve the issue, it seems to have created a new and much worse problem because the new idle speed is wildly inconsistent, causing the engine to hunt and surge. When decelerating into corners with the throttle closed, the hunting and surging can make it seem like the bike is starting to pull again on its own. I don’t know if this is an actual pull from the engine or if it’s just a sudden reduction in back-torque when the engine map starts to compensate for the closed throttle. Whatever the exact cause is, it is downright spooky, when you’re hauling ass into a decreasing-radius corner in the rain and the bike decides on its own to slightly re-open the throttle.

otomaps.com source article: www.netcarshow.com www.motorcycle.com www.roushperformance.com

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