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Home » BMW Motorcycle, motorcycle

BMW K 1200 GT 2006

Submitted by on March 29, 2012 – 11:22 pmNo Comment

The particular bike that I rode was, naturally, outfitted with most of the options offered, save for a taller windscreen and the anti-theft alarm. The bike starts easily and gets up to operating temperature quickly. The fuel injection works flawlessly from the slightest twist of the throttle all the way up to redline, which is around 10,200 rpm. Despite the claim of class-leading 152 horsepower at the crank, the GT never develops any top-end smack of acceleration. What it does exhibit (and I suspect dyno testing will prove) is a very linear but nonetheless powerful motor. A very minimal amount of engine vibration works its way through the foot pegs around the 4,000 rpm range but then quickly dissipates somewhere just north of the 5,000 rpm mark. Of equal note is just how quiet the whole operation is. No loud intake snort or cammy clatter worked its way into my memory.

Although no blistering paces were set during most of the day, I could still appreciate the force and sensitivity offered by the partial integral ABS; like other Beemers with this system, little servo motors work to assist in boosting braking power. The end result is a brake set that is very powerful with more than enough feel to allow one-finger modulation, even at speeds well beyond legal. The transmission is virtually transparent, just as exceptional as the rest of the engine, although a slight thud occurs when shifting into first from neutral. Not only is the tranny super slick, it shifted even more effortlessly while doing clutchless up shifts. Once again, there’s little to say because it simply works so well.

While tailing behind other riders during the day, I observed what I thought were modest lean angles that wouldn’t lend to a truly sporting ride. Imagine my surprise once our ride took us up the mountain. Not only does the ground clearance coincide with stellar cornering abilities which inspire rider confidence, it began to make me think that perhaps there were no foot pegs at all.

The ESA system may be optional on the GT but you shouldn’t give yourself any option other than to have it, should you purchase BMW’s latest. I can’t say unequivocally that it will make you corner like a demon while on the Sport setting but it most definitely will smooth out the road ahead when set to “Comfort.” This feature will be appreciated the most while covering decaying roadways, where the surface is uneven from repairs, damage and generally rough pavement. Switching from either Sport or Normal to Comfort (all of which can be chosen on the fly), I noticed a marked difference in how the road surface was translated–or not–through the bike to me. It was quite amazing to suddenly have a somewhat bumpy ride turn into what felt like a perfect roadway, as if someone had swapped the road out from underneath me. With a total of nine different settings when multiplying the three riding style choices by the three load settings (solo, solo with luggage and passenger with luggage), ESA becomes less of an option and

otomaps.com source article: www.netcarshow.com www.motorcycle.com www.roushperformance.com

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