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Home » BMW Motorcycle, motorcycle

BMW HP2 Sport 2008

Submitted by on March 29, 2012 – 11:31 pmNo Comment

In the automotive world, BMW’s M series cars build upon the chic-ness of the German brand. Cars carrying this designation in the model name are unique amongst rank and file BMWs. They may look like their siblings, but beneath the shared exterior beats the heart of a race-inspired mill, with performance-oriented suspension and handling components to complement the extra horsepower.

An M car to the casual observer looks like all the rest, but to the sharp eye of the motoring enthusiast seeing an M car tells them that the driver/owner cares less for image and more for the performance potential of the machine. Yep, those who know these vehicles know what they want, and they’re willing to pay the high price for the privilege.

The two-wheeled branch of BMW hadn’t had such a VIP status available for riders until recently. In mid-2006 the company announced the HP2 Enduro. Utilizing a hot-rodded version of the 1,170cc Boxer mill, the Enduro became a high-flying 105-horsepower dirt eater.

Next up was the HP2 Megamoto. With 17-inch wheels, sticky tires and long-travel suspenders, the Megamoto is the hooligan that BMW originally hoped they could create by having Enduro owners simply swap out spoke wheels and knobbies for 17-inch hoops with street tires. The Megamoto has trouble-maker written all over it, just like a true supermoto, save for the fact that it weighs in excess of 400 lbs.

Now comes the HP2 Sport.

The latest member of the high-performance Boxer family is a race bike at heart. This exquisite machine draws its lineage from the endurance-racing-proven R1200S that won its class at the 24 Hours of Le Mans this year.

The key difference in the Sport’s engine – and it’s an historic difference! – is the use of double overhead cams that employ drag levers, each opening a 39mm intake and 33mm exhaust valve (36mm and 31mm respectively on the R1200S). An OHC hasn’t been used in a Boxer head in, like, forever, dude!

The four valves per cylinder are arranged radially for “optimal flow,” as well as creating a more compact combustion chamber which eliminates the second spark plug as used on the R1200S. Intake and exhaust ports were machined for better flow, forged pistons are used to cope with the increased torque, as are “adapted” (“beefed-up” in Motorcycle.com speak) connecting rods. Compression is a respectable 12.5:1. Double oil coolers are arranged in series in the nose of the carbon/Kevlar composite front clip that’s been wind-tunneled designed to help aid air flow over said coolers.

BMW claims the HP2 Sport produces 130 hp at 8750 rpm and 84.8 ft-lbs of torque at 6000 rpm, with a max rev of 9500 rpm. The more workaday R1200S churns out a claimed 122 bhp at 8250 rpm and 83 ft-lbs at 6300 rpm.

To cap it off, the entirety of the head covers are carbon-fiber/Kevlar, with each having its own little slider puck that comes in quite handy; extreme angles aren’t necessary to touch the heads. A number of riders at the press launch had BMW techs raise ride height in order to pick up some ground clearance.

BMW may not care much for my comparison here, but the close-ratio six-speed tranny is of Japanese quality in its slickness and is rather transparent in operation, just like a good gearbox should be. Wailing down a racetrack is not the time or place to be thinking about a clunky gear set.

My slovenly shifting habits had me down one gear too many a couple of times; it was at those moments that the rear squawked and squirmed ever so slightly, leading me to safely assume that the HP2 Sport uses a non-slipper clutch. Something of an odd choice considering the bike’s race origins and today’s sportbike trends. In any event, clutch pull was very light.

otomaps.com source article: www.netcarshow.com www.motorcycle.com www.roushperformance.com

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