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Home » BMW Motorcycle, motorcycle

BMW G 650 X Series 2007

Submitted by on March 29, 2012 – 11:28 pmNo Comment

The balancing shaft remains in order to smooth out the ride; but the cylinder head has been redesigned, and in these bikes is a stressed member of the frame. Additionally, a new dry-sump oil tank resides behind the cylinder head while the same five-speed gearbox is retained from good ol’ reliable, Mr. F650. When it’s all said and done the refining and lightening of various bits here and there are said to have saved a healthy 4.4lbs. Spinning more freely these days, the single is claimed to produce 53hp — apparently a three bhp increase — at 7,000 rpm with a claimed and respectable 44 ft-lb of torque at 5,250 rpm.

Beyond the single-cylinder mill, the trio also share the same “bridge-type” tubular steel frame with cast aluminum side sections, aluminum sub-frame and alloy swingarm. Suspension is also similar with all models sharing the same shell of the Marzocchi 45mm USD fork. However, the Xchallenge and Xmoto have the addition of rebound and compression adjusters. The Xcountry and Xmoto share the same dial operated pre-load adjustable rear gas shock, while the Xchallenge the much-talked about BMW Motorrad Air Damping System found on the HP2 Enduro.

Because of a heavy focus on dirty environs, the Xchallenge has a healthy spring travel of 10.6 inches at both ends. The Xmoto comes pretty close with 10.6 inches up front and precisely one inch less travel at the back. With a more casual riding attitude the Xcountry doesn’t require as much bounce so travel is 9.4 inches up front and 8.3 inches under your tushy. The stopping process is a function of the new “two-channel” 3.3lbs Bosch ABS system as found on the R1200S and the new F 800 S/ST. Thinking of the hooligans among you, BMW has graced each bike with the ability to disable the optional ABS.

This is especially handy — or not — on the Xcountry and Xchallenge when dirt comes your way. And for owners of the Xmoto disabling ABS would make efforts to “back it in” much easier. The Xcountry and Xchallenge have a single dual piston caliper clamping down on a 300mm rotor — the Xchallenge utilizes a more modern wave-type rotor — and the Xmoto beefs things up with a four-piston caliper crushing a 320mm floating rotor.

Brake rotors have to be attached to something, right? In the case of the Xchallenge that would be a pair of spoked wheels. The Xchallenge rolls on a 21-inch front with a 90/90-21 tire and an 18-inch unit for the rear with a 140/80-18 tire. The Xcountry also spins gleefully down pavement or dirt on a set of spoked rims. The front measures 19 inches and carries a 100/90-19 tire while the rear is a 17-incher with a 130/80-17 tire attached. The Xmoto is the mold here with its cast, 17-inch wheels front and rear which carry 120/70-17 and 160/60-17 tires respectively.

A smart hold over from the F series is the center-of-gravity-conscious fuel tank tucked beneath the saddle. This location does well to keep weight low, but an unfortunate function of the tank is the location of its filler neck. The gas cap is easy enough to access just below the saddle on the right.

Take note though that the bike must be on its side stand when fueling; if not you’ll have petrol in all the places except where you want it. I realize this is a ridiculous observation unless you’re someone who normally rides with an exceptionally strong grinder monkey trained to hold the bike steady.

After wiping down the right rear of the bike from you’re first fueling, thumb the starter button and you’ll be on your way, or as far as two and a half gallons will take you. BMW figures the range to be about 155 miles. Once the raw fuel you did manage to get in the tank is ingested by the injection system, burned in the combustion chamber and its remains pushed out through the exhaust valves past the catalytic converter — damn those tough EU3 standards! — they’ll greet the world via a high-mount single exhaust can on the left.

The German bike maker did a nice job of tucking such a bulky looking device up and out of the way. They did an even better job of blending it with each bike’s unique look.

Continuing with the share and share alike mentality the bikes use the same tough — take my word on that — tapered Magura handlebar and control levers. Instrumentation keeps the pattern of one for all and all for one; the tidy little unit has a large LCD display offering a digital speedo, clock, battery voltage indicator, the usual odometer and two trip meters.

otomaps.com source article: www.netcarshow.com www.motorcycle.com www.roushperformance.com

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