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Home » BMW Motorcycle, motorcycle

BMW F800R 2011

Submitted by on March 30, 2012 – 12:17 amNo Comment

“A runaway success” is how Pieter De Waal, VP of BMW Motorrad USA, describes the S1000RR, especially considering the current depressed market. “When selling something nobody needs,” De Waal says, “you’d better give them a very good reason to buy.”

So, in its quest to get “younger, more dynamic riders,” the futuristically urban F800R is offered to American riders for the first time, replacing the mechanically similar F800S in BMW’s 2011 lineup. The 800ST remains unchanged.

The F800R is essentially a stripped version of the 800ST that earned our respect when it beat Honda’s competent VFR800 Interceptor in a sport-touring shootout.

Key distinctions aside from the 800R’s obvious lack of fairings are a double-sided swingarm replacing the ST’s single-sided arm and asymmetric dual headlights sporting H7 bulbs. The ST’s low-maintenance belt drive is replaced with a chain and sprockets in the same final-drive ratio, while gears 4 to 6 are shorter. Its sixth gear matches fifth on the 800GS.

At a list price of $9950 (plus a $495 destination charge), the F800R retails for about $1000 less than the base F800ST’s $10,990 MSRP. Deleting the ST’s single-sided swinger and belt drive keeps the R’s price under that magic $10K mark. BMW reps say a belt-drive system costs more than a chain.

As a naked sporty bike, the F800R is a decathlete of sorts, able to barge its way through commuter traffic on Monday then tear up the canyons on weekends. A comfortably upright stance yields accommodating ergonomics, with the one-piece handlebar just a slight forward reach – perfect.

Ergos fall a bit short only with marginal seat-to-peg room. The standard seat sits at a modest 31.5 inches; optional-at-no-extra-charge seats bring it 1 inch in either direction. Adjustable footpegs would be a worthy addition to a multi-purpose bike like this one. Mirrors are mounted a little too low for easy rear views.

New to our F800R is updated switchgear incorporating Molded Interconnect Device (MID) switches, in which a laser creates circuits and conductors in the plastic housings instead of using individual wires for each circuit. This allows for multi-function switches within compact dimensions. For example, the functions for the starter and kill button have been combined in a single rocker switch.

Another notable bit of info about switches: The F800R is the latest BMW model to abandon the German brand’s traditional three-button turnsignal arrangement in favor of a single combined switch on the left side like all other bikes except for Harleys. All switches on the 800R feel precise and smooth, and adjustable levers provide variable reach.

BMW’s middleweight roadster feels slim between the knees, aided by the fuel tank being housed under the seat. With its maximum of 4.1 gallons on board, the R is said to weigh a reasonable 440 lbs.

The F-R fires up readily and quickly settles into a low idle. Its 798cc parallel-Twin engine is familiar to F800 owners, using the same 360-degree firing order in which one combustion event occurs each crank rotation, with pistons going up and down together. This is the same firing sequence used on BMW’s Boxer Twins, giving them a similar exhaust sound.

Despite an uninspiring exhaust note, the F800 motor is very effective. BMW notes that it has more torque than anything else in its class, and it indeed pulls strong from just 3000 revs. The engine’s flexibility is aided by a fantastic gearbox – light, positive and seamless. Its only flaw is a clutch that engages at the end of its travel over a fairly narrow friction zone.

Although the DOHC cylinder head design is similar to the K1300 engines, using finger followers for cam actuation, the parallel-Twin is no screamer. It has a linear power build-up that comes on strong at 6000 rpm when its torque peaks, rushing forward to its 80 rear-wheel horsepower climax, as measured on the 800ST when we last tested it. BMW tells us to expect nearly identical numbers.

New to the F800R is the use of a variable-pressure fuel system that precisely supplies fuel volume and its timing according to the power requested. This makes it more efficient than a constant-flow system which varies fuel only by duration, with no variance in timing, and it eliminates the need of a fuel-return line. This sophistication requires an ECU with four times the processing power, and BMW says it offers improved power delivery, better economy and fewer emissions.

otomaps.com source article: www.netcarshow.com www.motorcycle.com www.roushperformance.com

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