classic

classic automotive reviews, specifications, insurance accident lawyers information, cars, motorcycle honda aprilia lamborghini yamaha Harley Davidson ATV news

Finance

Finance automotive reviews, specifications, insurance accident lawyers information, cars, motorcycle honda aprilia lamborghini yamaha Harley Davidson ATV news

insurance

Insurance automotive reviews, specifications, insurance accident lawyers information, cars, motorcycle honda aprilia lamborghini yamaha Harley Davidson ATV news

accident

accident automotive reviews, specifications, insurance accident lawyers information, cars, motorcycle honda aprilia lamborghini yamaha Harley Davidson ATV news

news

news automotive reviews, specifications, insurance accident lawyers information, cars, motorcycle honda aprilia lamborghini yamaha Harley Davidson ATV news

Home » BMW Motorcycle, motorcycle

BMW F650GS 2009

Submitted by on March 29, 2012 – 11:42 pmNo Comment

Those who choose the F650GS may do so not only for the smaller proportions, but also the smaller impact on the pocketbook. For all the cost savings gained by purchasing the 650 over the 800, the differences between the two are fairly minimal. Though the street-oriented F650GS hasn’t as much spring in its step, there wasn’t any need to give its cylinders any different positioning, so it shares the same basic engine as the F800GS with a few subtle differences. Although the engine is essentially the same, the 650 has lower horsepower and torque. After switching the cams and de-tuning the electronics, the F650GS pumps out 71 hp and 55.3 ft-lbs of torque where its 800 sibling offers 85 hp and 59.7 ft-lbs of torque. So what other differences exist besides 14 hp and 4.4 ft-lbs of torque? The 650 also has a slimmer radiator, lower seat height, low wind-screen, conventional telescope fork, cast wheels, 19-inch front wheel, single front disc brake and a lower spec mono shock.

BMW’s vision for the F650GS was that it would be the introduction model into the larger adventure motorcycles. This is smart marketing on BMW’s part. Not everyone is ready to tackle the power and size of the 1200, but they now have various options available to them to get into a smaller, more manageable platform with the intention of one day graduating to a larger model. If BMW manages to steal a few potential Suzuki DL650 customers in the process then that wouldn’t hurt its cause either. The fact that I stand six feet tall, I wondered about how I would fit on the mini GS. But with the lower seat swapped in favor of the original standard seat, it proved to be more than adequate. In fact, a number of my vertically challenged friends couldn’t touch their feet to the ground while in the saddle. It appears this mini GS isn’t so mini after all.

Although the 650 is the entry-level version of the family, it by no means feels cheap or inadequate. The digital display, rear-mounted locking gas cap, controls and the Twin powerplant all exude quality in the fit and finish. Knowing full well that the turnsignals switchgear of Beemers are a significant point of contention, I must say that I came to enjoy the placement of the switches. I do, however, feel that they should be cancelled like Harley-Davidsons instead of having that third signal kill switch. Much like my brother-in-law, the signal cancel switch is pretty much a waste of space that could be better used by something, anything really. The switchgear on the 2009 BMW K1300s eschew this long-derided system in favor of a traditional single-button control.

While I did find myself hitting the horn instead of the turnsignal switch a number of times initially, I found the brake fluid reservoir to be much more of an oddity. The relatively large plastic container sat precariously on the handlebar above the windscreen so that it would bounce around like a bobble-head doll at high speeds. It almost seemed like an afterthought like the Scooby Doo horn my Dad zip-tied to the handlebars of my first two-wheeler. I digress.

otomaps.com source article: www.netcarshow.com www.motorcycle.com www.roushperformance.com

Leave a comment!

Add your comment below, or trackback from your own site. You can also subscribe to these comments via RSS.

Be nice. Keep it clean. Stay on topic. No spam.

You can use these tags:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

This is a Gravatar-enabled weblog. To get your own globally-recognized-avatar, please register at Gravatar.

*