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Home » Kawasaki Motorcylce, motorcycle

2010 Kawasaki Vulcan 1700 Voyager

Submitted by on April 7, 2012 – 3:12 amNo Comment

Somewhat lost in the luxury T-C niche is Kawasaki’s Voyager. Debuting in 2009 alongside the Vulcan 1700 it is based on, the Voyager is a bagger in the mold of a Harley Electra Glide or Road Glide. The formula is a thumping V-Twin stuck in a cruiser chassis and fitted with a half fairing, plush seats and several luxury and convenience items.

Kawasaki has ticked all the right boxes when it built the Voyager. Its 103.7-cubic-inch 52-degree V-Twin outmuscles the Motor Company’s 96-incher, combining more displacement with modern features like 4-valve heads and liquid-cooled upper cylinders.

The Voyager’s best matches up with Harley’s Road Glide Ultra, as both utilize a blocky frame-mounted fairing for protection from the elements. Full of fuel and ready to ride, they weigh within 2 lbs of each other at 886 and 888 lbs, respectively.

We already had a chance to test the Voyager during its introduction, but our time was split between riding four versions of the Vulc 17 platform (Vulcan, Vulcan LT, Nomad and Voyager), thus we didn’t really get enough seat time to fully explore the intricacies of Kawi’s top-of-the-line touring rig. So when Team K invited us up to Calistoga, California to take a meandering route back into SoCal for a two-day jaunt, we eagerly accepted.

So, on a bright summer morning, we loaded up a Voyager for our trip south. This kind of bike is designed to carry two people in comfort, so my wife, Carolyn, came along to test the pillion accommodations. Longtime riders will know that the addition of a female to a trip can tax a bike’s storage capacity, but the Voyager sucked up all we had.

The attractive saddlebags are reasonably large at 38 liters each, but it’s the 50-liter top box that really expands the Voyager’s luggage capacity by inhaling items of nearly any size, including two full-face helmets when not stuffed with clothes and makeup and curling irons. A highly visible LED light-bar spans the rear width of the trunk and augments the V-shaped LED taillight.

The cargo box also incorporates a plush backrest and minimal armrests for a passenger, adding comfort and security. A broad and supportive pillion seat will keep your significant other content during long stints, aided by floorboards that allow a variety of knee bends.

The Voyager’s front seat is at least as pleasing. It’s placed at a fairly low 28.7 inches (0.4 inch lower than its H-D rivals) despite being thickly padded, and it delivers a neutral ergonomic triangle with a comfortable bar bend and roomy floorboards that fit riders of all sizes.

Laid out in front of a rider is an eye-catching instrument panel with vintage-look gauges, including a separate tach and speedo in a retro circular design bookended by smaller round gauges for fuel and coolant temp. A central LCD panel displays info about average fuel economy, range to empty, clock and a gear-position indicator. At the bottom of the dashboard is the display for the audio menus that incorporate readouts for iPod docking.

otomaps.com source article: www.netcarshow.com www.motorcycle.com www.roushperformance.com

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