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Home » Kawasaki Motorcylce, motorcycle

2010 Kawasaki Ninja 250R

Submitted by on April 6, 2012 – 12:04 amNo Comment

Motivated by a smooth-running DOHC 249cc parallel-Twin pushing a peak of 25.4 hp to the rear wheel, this 374-lb machine offers enough power to stay ahead of around-town and suburban traffic, and will top out around an indicated 100 mph or so.

Its twin Keihin constant-velocity carburetors aren’t as sophisticated as the fuel-injection on the Euro version, and the twin carbs are jetted lean to pass emissions regs. This results in an engine that needs to be warmed up before it’s able to be ridden away, and low-end throttle response is a bit soggy.

“It’s definitely on the lean side in the low end and midrange,” says Kerry Bryant, who has tuned many Ninja 250s as owner of Area P, a SoCal-based shop that also manufactures exhaust systems. “Changing/adjusting the jetting can make a dramatic improvement in throttle response, even with the OEM exhaust system.”

Once warmed up after a few minutes, the machine will accelerate from a standstill with the revs at around 3,000 rpm while slipping the clutch. Carburetor tuning is not a pre-requisite, but to make it run the way it could, it is something we would do.

With a jet kit installed, Bryant says, “The primary difference a street rider will notice is throttle response more than anything else. It will now feel like your right hand actually controls and modulates the power input like it should be.”

In stock trim, the liquid-cooled mill is reliable and quick. Although the power delivery is soft off the bottom and requires some clutch slipping, it responds with enthusiasm once past 8,000 rpm until 11,500 rpm when power begins tapering off before hitting the 13,000-rpm rev limit. A brisk pace requires gear changes to its six-speed transmission at short intervals.

The powerplant rolls within a steel diamond-style frame, utilizing Kawasaki’s Uni-Trak rear suspension with five-position preload, in conjunction with a 37mm telescopic fork canted at a stable yet nimble 26 degrees rake, and 3.2 inches trail.

Slowing it all down are brakes that are reliable and drama-free. A single 290mm front rotor clamped by a twin-piston caliper does most of the work, with the 220mm rear and twin-piston caliper rear there for backup.

Riders accustomed to bikes with four times the power will feel underwhelmed on sweepers because this bike doesn’t go into warp drive when requested like a literbike can, but newer riders, or those just not looking for a ten-tenths experience ought to enjoy the ride. On tighter roads, the Ninja 250R leaves little to be desired. Assuming the rider has the skills, its lighter weight, quick and neutral steering can give larger and faster bikes a run for their money.

Stock tires for our California bike were IRC RX-01 front and rear specific, although Kawasaki may spec equivalent Bridgestones and Dunlops in other regions. Sized at 110/70-17 front, and 130/70-17 rear, the IRC rubber is plenty adequate for most uses. Aggressive riders may want to experiment with premium sport-compound tires when the originals eventually wear out.

To complete its role as an entry-level sportbike, there’s another benefit potentially available. While wearing race leathers during parking lot cornering practice, we discovered that compared to some larger sportbikes, the Ninja’s low saddle and confident handling makes scuffing knee pucks somewhat easier

otomaps.com source article: www.netcarshow.com www.motorcycle.com www.roushperformance.com

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