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Home » ATV, Kawasaki ATV

2010 Kawasaki Mule 4010 Trans4x4

Submitted by on August 7, 2012 – 2:26 amNo Comment

Make no mistake; the Mule is designed for use as a workhorse and not a trail ride. You can see that in every detail including the heavy-duty steel floorboards and bed. You can also see the orientation toward work in the layout of the controls. To the left of the steering wheel is a lever for selecting to run the rear differential as open or locked. In locked mode both wheels will turn at the same speed and thereby provide superior traction in mud and snow and uneven terrain. In open mode, it allows the rear wheels to turn at different speeds making it capable of traveling across more fragile surfaces like grass and gravel while afflicting less damage to them. The option of having the rear differential open also tightens the turning radius and decreases tire wear on harder surfaces like concrete and asphalt. To the right of the steering wheel is a lever for selecting between either the 2WD or 4WD modes. Also on the right is the transmission’s Y-gated shifter, with neutral in the center and reverse to the right and rearward. Low range is forward from that and high range is forward and to the left.

New this year is the Electric Power Steering. Input from the Mule’s speed and torque sensors determines the amount of steering assistance required from the system’s electric motor. At over 1600 pounds, the Mule is no lightweight so the power steering makes maneuvering the Mule around in tight situations much easier – especially on hard-packed surfaces like asphalt and concrete. To keep the power steering unit from possibly running the battery down, the EPS only operates when the engine is running.

Powering the 4010 is a liquid-cooled, 617cc V-Twin industrial engine that now features Digital Fuel Injection (DFI) – a feature first introduced for the 2009 model year. DFI is designed to automatically compensate for changes in the atmospheric pressure, air and engine temperature for easier starting under a wide variety of conditions. For those of us that use our machines in the cold of winter, for hauling hay or plowing snow, the fuel injection proves to be a huge plus for its ease of starting in sub-freezing temperatures. The industrial based engine has been designed for extended use having a large capacity radiator and fan. It is also well isolated having rubber engine and transmission mounts to minimize vibration, noise and wear.

Another feature proving that the Mule was made primarily for work is that the engine is governed for a maximum speed of 25mph. According to Kawasaki this is done at the request of large companies in an effort to provide a safer work-site environment. Maybe that’s true, but for those of us able to use the Mule out in open ranch country or in town, 25 mph is about 10mph too slow!

Like the industrial engine, the CVT transmission has been designed with hours of hard use in mind, with a larger torque converter to maximize the engagement area and a thicker and stronger drive belt for improved heat dissipation and added durability. Even the CVT cover has been designed to help cool the transmission during hard use and is attached in a way to provide for easy belt adjustability. The air intakes for the engine and CVT are located up near the top of the roll cage in an effort to draw cleaner air into the filters for both the engine and the CVT. And like the air filter for the engine, the Mule also has a replaceable filter for the CVT transmission. Located under the driver’s seat is the oil dipstick and filler tube. Oddly enough, also there is the fuel gauge – something we think certainly deserves to be placed on the dashboard for easier observation.

otomaps.com source article: www.netcarshow.com www.motorcycle.com www.roushperformance.com

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